February 07, 2012

Dairy Queens, Bastards, Jest and more Books to check out

Gerber, Matthew. 2012. Bastards: Politics, Family, and Law in Early Modern France. New York: Oxford University Press.


My reading list is getting bigger again (every now and then I go a little crazy and book browsing turns into heavy duty book shopping!...I am not alone right?)

So I thought I would share some of the works I am most excited about with you!




Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), Constance C. McPhee, and Nadine Orenstein. 2011. Infinite Jest: Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine . New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art.


Desan, Suzanne, and Jeffrey Merrick. 2009.Family, Gender, and Law in Early Modern France. University Park, Pa: Pennsylvania State University Press.



McMurran, Mary Helen. 2010. The Spread of Novels: Translation and Prose Fiction in the Eighteenth Century (Translation/Transnation). Princeton: Princeton University Press.



Williams, Carolyn D., Angela Escott, and Louise Duckling. 2010. Woman to Woman: Female Negotiations During the Long Eighteenth Century. Newark: University of Delaware Press.



Martin, Meredith. 2011. Dairy Queens: The Politics of Pastoral Architecture from Catherine de' Medici to Marie-Antoinette . Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.



And finally, I want to suggest Jane Austen Made me Do it. This book is edited by our very own Laurel Ann Nattress and is full of short stories all inspired by Jane Austen's characters.  It is a fun and easy read, and I digested a story each night before bed. So put it on your must-read-for-fun list if you also can't  get enough of Ms. Austen!

Nattress, Laurel Ann. 2011. Jane Austen Made Me Do It: Original Stories Inspired by Literature's Most Astute Observer of the Human Heart. New York: Ballantine Books Trade Paperbacks.


One of my readers has suggested the following title:

The Journal of Madam Knight:
A diary kept in 1704 by Sarah Kemble Knight on her hazardous round-trip journey from Boston to New York. Filled with witty comments on the manner of the people Madam Knight encountered, the lack of suitable accommodations, and the geography of early New England.
Sounds great!

For more book suggestions check out my Eighteenth Century Book List.
Happy reading!!

2 comments

  1. Thanks so much for the book recommendations. I love a good read.
    In kind, I would like to share a little book I found on a sale rack a while back if you haven't come across it:

    THE JOURNAL OF MADAM KNIGHT by Sarah Kemble Knight - A Woman's Treacherous Journey by Horseback from Boston to New York in the Year 1704.
    Colonial, not French or English, but of the period. It was published by Applewood Press in Bedford MA.

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  2. @Anonymous thank you so much for sharing the book it sounds really great! I will be checking my library for a copy :o)

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